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Colchicine Tablets

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. DESCRIPTION 7. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
2. INDICATIONS AND USAGE 8. ADVERSE REACTIONS
3. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION 9. OVERDOSAGE
4. CONTRAINDICATIONS 10. DRUG INTERACTIONS
5. MECHANISM OF ACTION 11. PHARMACOKINETICS
6. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 12. HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

 

1. DESCRIPTION

Colchicine is an alkaloid chemically described as (S)N- (5,6,7,9-tetrahydro- 1,2,3, 10-tetramethoxy-9-oxobenzo [alpha] heptalen-7-yl) acetamide with a molecular formula of C22H25NO6 and a molecular weight of 399.4. The structural formula of colchicine is given below.

Colchicine occurs as a pale yellow powder that is soluble in water.

Colchicine, USP tablets are supplied for oral administration as purple, film-coated, capsule-shaped tablets (0.1575” × 0.3030”), debossed with ‘AR 374’ on one side and scored on the other, containing 0.6 mg of the active ingredient colchicine USP. Inactive ingredients: carnauba wax, FD&C blue #2, FD&C red #40, hypromellose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, polydextrose, polyethylene glycol, pregelatinized starch, sodium starch glycolate, titanium dioxide, and triacetin.

2. INDICATIONS AND USAGE

2.1 Gout Flares

Colchicine, USP tablets are indicated for prophylaxis and the treatment of acute gout flares.

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

Colchicine is indicated for prophylaxis of gout flares.

Treatment of Gout Flares:

Colchicine tablets are indicated for treatment of acute gout flares when taken at the first sign of a flare.

2.2 Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF)

Colchicine, USP tablets are indicated in adults and children 4 years or older for treatment of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

3. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The long term use of colchicine is established for FMF and the prophylaxis of gout flares but the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment for gout flares has not been evaluated. The dosing regimens for colchicine are different for each indication and must be individualized.

The recommended dosage of colchicine depends on the patient’s age, renal function, hepatic function, and use of co-administered drugs [see Dose Modification for Co-administration of Interacting Drugs].

Colchicine tablets are administered orally, without regard to meals.

Colchicine is not an analgesic medication and should not be used to treat pain from other causes.

3.1 Gout Flares

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

The recommended dosage of colchicine for prophylaxis of gout flares for adults and adolescents older than 16 years of age is 0.6 mg once or twice daily. The maximum recommended dose for prophylaxis of gout flares is 1.2 mg/day.

Treatment of Gout Flares:

The recommended dose of colchicine for treatment of a gout flare is 1.2 mg (2 tablets) at the first sign of the flare followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) one hour later. Higher doses have not been found to be more effective. The maximum recommended dose for treatment of gout flares is 1.8 mg over a 1 hour period. Colchicine may be administered for treatment of a gout flare during prophylaxis at doses not to exceed 1.2 mg (2 tablets) at the first sign of the flare followed by 0.6 mg (1 tablet) one hour later. Wait 12 hours and then resume the prophylactic dose.

3.2 FMF

The recommended dosage of colchicine for FMF in adults is 1.2 mg to 2.4 mg daily.

Colchicine should be increased as needed to control disease and as tolerated in increments of 0.3 mg/day to a maximum recommended daily dose. If intolerable side effects develop, the dose should be decreased in increments of 0.3 mg/day. The total daily colchicine dose may be administered in one to two divided doses.

3.3 Recommended Pediatric Dosage

Prophylaxis and Treatment of Gout Flares:

Colchicine is not recommended for pediatric use in prophylaxis or treatment of gout flares.

FMF:

The recommended dosage of colchicine for FMF in pediatric patients 4 years of age and older is based on age. The following daily doses may be given as a single or divided dose twice daily:

• Children 4 – 6 years: 0.3 mg to 1.8 mg daily

• Children 6 – 12 years: 0.9 mg to 1.8 mg daily

• Adolescents older than 12 years: 1.2 mg to 2.4 mg daily

3.4 Dose Modification for Co-administration of Interacting Drugs

Concomitant Therapy:

Co-administration with drugs known to inhibit CYP3A4 and/or P-glycoprotein (P-gp) increases the risk of colchicine-induced toxic effects (Table 1). If patients are taking or have recently completed treatment with drugs listed in Table 1 within the prior 14 days, the dose of colchicine should be reduced as shown below [See DRUG INTERACTIONS].

Table 1: Colchicine Dose Adjustment for Co-administration with Interacting Drugs if no Alternative Available1

1 For magnitude of effect on colchicine plasma concentrations [see Pharmacokinetics]

2 Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given colchicine in conjunction with strong CYP3A4 or P-gp inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

3 When used in combination with Ritonavir, see dosing recommendations for strong CYP3A4 inhibitors [see CONTRAINDICATIONS].

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Table 2. Colchicine Dose Adjustment for Co-administration with Protease Inhibitors

Treatment of gout flares with colchicine is not recommended in patients receiving prophylactic dose of colchicine and CYP3A4 inhibitors.

3.5 Dose Modification in Renal Impairment

Clcr in mL/minute may be estimated from serum creatinine (mg/dL) determination using the following formula:

Gout Flares:

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Renal Impairment].

Treatment of Gout Flares:

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (1 tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every 2 weeks [see Renal Impairment].

Treatment of gout flares with colchicine is not recommended in patients with renal impairment who are receiving colchicine for prophylaxis.

FMF:

Caution should be taken in dosing patients with moderate and severe renal impairment and in patients undergoing dialysis. For these patients, the dosage should be reduced. Patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal impairment should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction may be necessary. For patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/minute), start with 0.3 mg/day; any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine. [See Renal Impairment]. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended starting dose should be 0.3 mg (half tablet) per day. Dosing can be increased with close monitoring. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine.

3.6 Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment

Gout Flares:

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Hepatic Impairment].

Treatment of Gout Flares:

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment while the dose does not need to be adjusted, but a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Hepatic Impairment].

Treatment of gout flares with colchicine is not recommended in patients with hepatic impairment who are receiving colchicine for prophylaxis.

FMF:

Patients with mild to moderate hepatic impairment should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered in patients with severe hepatic impairment [See Hepatic Impairment].

4. CONTRAINDICATIONS

Patients with renal or hepatic impairment should not be given colchicine in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. In these patients, life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with colchicine taken in therapeutic doses.

5. MECHANISM OF ACTION

The mechanism by which colchicine exerts its beneficial effect in patients with FMF has not been fully elucidated; however, evidence suggests that colchicine may interfere with the intracellular assembly of the inflammasome complex present in neutrophils and monocytes that mediates activation of interleukin-1β. Additionally, colchicine disrupts cytoskeletal functions through inhibition of β-tubulin polymerization into microtubules, and consequently prevents the activation, degranulation, and migration of neutrophils thought to mediate some gout symptoms.

6. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

6.1 Usage in Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies with colchicine in pregnant women. Colchicine crosses the human placenta. While not studied in the treatment of gout flares, data from a limited number of published studies found no evidence of an increased risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, or teratogenic effects among pregnant women using colchicine to treat familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Although animal reproductive and developmental studies were not conducted with colchicine, published animal reproduction and development studies indicate that colchicine causes embryofetal toxicity, teratogenicity, and altered postnatal development at exposures within or above the clinical therapeutic range. Colchicine should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

6.2 Labor and Delivery

The effect of colchicine on labor and delivery is unknown.

6.3 Nursing Mothers

Colchicine is excreted into human milk. Limited information suggests that exclusively breastfed infants receive less than 10 percent of the maternal weight-adjusted dose. While there are no published reports of adverse effects in breast-feeding infants of mothers taking colchicine, colchicine can affect gastrointestinal cell renewal and permeability. Caution should be exercised and breastfeeding infants should be observed for adverse effects when colchicine is administered to a nursing woman.

6.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and efficacy of colchicine in children of all ages with FMF has been evaluated in uncontrolled studies. There does not appear to be an adverse effect on growth in children with FMF treated long-term with colchicine. Gout is rare in pediatric patients, safety and effectiveness of colchicine in pediatric patients has not been established.

6.5 Geriatric Use

Clinical studies with colchicine for treatment of gout flares and for treatment of FMF did not include sufficient numbers of patients aged 65 years and older to determine whether they respond differently from younger patients. In general, dose selection for an elderly patient with gout should be cautious, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased renal function, concomitant disease, or other drug therapy [see Dose Modification for Co-administration of Interacting Drugs].

6.6 Renal Impairment

Colchicine is significantly excreted in urine in healthy subjects. Clearance of colchicine is decreased in patients with impaired renal function. Total body clearance of colchicine was reduced by 75% in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

Gout Flares:

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild (estimated creatinine clearance Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, the starting dose should be 0.3 mg per day and any increase in dose should be done with close monitoring. For the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients undergoing dialysis, the starting doses should be 0.3 mg given twice a week with close monitoring [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment].

Treatment of Gout Flares:

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) to moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, in patients with severe impairment, while the dose does not need to be adjusted for the treatment of gout flares, a treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For patients with gout flares requiring repeated courses consideration should be given to alternate therapy. For patients undergoing dialysis, the total recommended dose for the treatment of gout flares should be reduced to a single dose of 0.6 mg (1 tablet). For these patients, the treatment course should not be repeated more than once every 2 weeks [see Dose Modification in Renal Impairment].

FMF:

Although, pharmacokinetics of colchicine in patients with mild (Clcr 50 – 80 mL/min) and moderate (Clcr 30 – 50 mL/min) renal impairment is not known, these patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction may be necessary. In patients with severe renal failure (Clcr less than 30 mL/minute) and end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis, colchicine may be started at the dose of 0.3 mg/day. Any increase in dose should be done with adequate monitoring of the patient for adverse effects of colchicine [See Pharmacokinetics and Dose Modification in Renal Impairment].

6.7 Hepatic Impairment

The clearance of colchicine may be significantly reduced and plasma half-life prolonged in patients with chronic hepatic impairment, compared to healthy subjects [See Pharmacokinetics].

Gout Flares:

Prophylaxis of Gout Flares:

For prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. Dose reduction should be considered for the prophylaxis of gout flares in patients with severe hepatic impairment [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment].

Treatment of Gout Flares:

For treatment of gout flares in patients with mild to moderate hepatic function impairment, adjustment of the recommended colchicine dose is not required, but patients should be monitored closely for adverse effects of colchicine. However, for the treatment of gout flares in patients with severe impairment while the dose does not need to be adjusted, the treatment course should be repeated no more than once every 2 weeks. For these patients, requiring repeated courses for the treatment of gout flares, consideration should be given to alternate therapy [see Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment].

FMF

In patients with severe hepatic disease, dose reduction should be considered with careful monitoring as necessary [See Pharmacokinetics and Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment].

7. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

7.1 Fatal Overdose

Fatal overdoses, both accidental and intentional, have been reported in adults and children who have ingested colchicine [See OVERDOSAGE]. Colchicine should be kept out of the reach of children.

7.2 Blood Dyscrasias

Myelosuppression, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, and aplastic anemia with colchicine used in therapeutic doses have been reported.

7.3 Drug Interactions

Colchicine is a P-gp and CYP3A4 substrate. Life-threatening and fatal drug interactions have been reported in patients treated with colchicine given with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. If treatment with a P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitor is required in patients with normal renal and hepatic function, the patient’s dose of colchicine may need to be reduced or interrupted [See DRUG INTERACTIONS]. Use of colchicine in conjunction with P-gp or strong CYP3A4 inhibitors is contraindicated in patients with renal or hepatic impairment [See CONTRAINDICATIONS].

7.4 Neuromuscular Toxicity

Colchicine-induced neuromuscular toxicity and rhabdomyolysis have been reported with chronic treatment in therapeutic doses. Patients with renal dysfunction and elderly patients, even those with normal renal and hepatic function, are at increased risk. Concomitant use of atorvastatin, simvastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin, gemfibrozil, fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, or benzafibrate (themselves associated with myotoxicity) or cyclosporine may potentiate the development of myopathy [See DRUG INTERACTIONS]. Once colchicine is stopped, the symptoms generally resolve within 1 week to several months.

8. ADVERSE REACTIONS

Gout Flares:

The most common adverse reaction is diarrhea (23%). Pharyngolaryngeal pain was seen in 3% of patients treated for gout flares.

FMF:

Gastrointestinal tract adverse effects are the most frequent side effects in patients initiating colchicine, usually presenting within 24 hours, and occurring in up to 20% of patients given therapeutic doses. Typical symptoms include cramping, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. These events should be viewed as dose-limiting if severe as they can herald the onset of more significant toxicity.

8.1 Clinical Trials Experience in Gout

Because clinical studies are conducted under widely varying and controlled conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in clinical studies of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical studies of another drug, and may not predict the rates observed in a broader patient population in clinical practice.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in patients with a gout flare, gastrointestinal adverse reactions occurred in 26% of patients using the recommended dose (1.8 mg over 1 hour) compared to 77% of patients taking a non-recommended high-dose (4.8 mg over 6 hours) and 20% of patients taking placebo. Diarrhea was the most commonly reported drug-related gastrointestinal adverse event. As shown in Table 3, diarrhea is associated with treatment. Diarrhea was more likely to occur in patients taking the high-dose regimen than the low-dose regimen. Severe diarrhea occurred in 19% and vomiting occurred in 17% of patients taking the non-recommended high-dose colchicine regimen but did not occur in the recommended low-dose colchicine regimen.

Table 3: Number (%) of Patients with at Least One Drug-Related Treatment Emergent Adverse Events with an Incidence of ≥ 2% of Patients in Any Treatment Group

8.2 Postmarketing Experience

Serious toxic manifestations associated with colchicine include myelosuppression, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and injury to cells in the renal, hepatic, circulatory, and central nervous systems. These most often occur with excessive accumulation or overdosage [See OVERDOSAGE].

The following adverse reactions have been reported with colchicine. These have been generally reversible upon temporarily interrupting treatment or lowering the dose of colchicine.

Neurological: sensory motor neuropathy

Dermatological: alopecia, maculopapular rash, purpura, rash

Digestive: abdominal cramping, abdominal pain, diarrhea, lactose intolerance, nausea, vomiting

Hematological: leukopenia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia

Hepatobiliary: elevated AST, elevated ALT

Musculoskeletal: myopathy, elevated CPK, myotonia, muscle weakness, muscle pain, rhabdomyolysis

Reproductive: azoospermia, oligospermia

9. OVERDOSAGE

The exact dose of colchicine that produces significant toxicity is unknown. Fatalities have occurred after ingestion of a dose as low as 7 mg over a 4-day period, while other patients have survived after ingesting more than 60 mg. A review of 150 patients who overdosed on colchicine found that those who ingested less than 0.5 mg/kg survived and tended to have milder toxicities, such as gastrointestinal symptoms, whereas those who took 0.5 to 0.8 mg/kg had more severe reactions, such as myelosuppression. There was 100% mortality in those who ingested more than 0.8 mg/kg.

The first stage of acute colchicine toxicity typically begins within 24 hours of ingestion and includes gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and significant fluid loss, leading to volume depletion. Peripheral leukocytosis may also be seen. Life-threatening complications occur during the second stage, which occurs 24 to 72 hours after drug administration, attributed to multi-organ failure and its consequences. Death is usually a result of respiratory depression and cardiovascular collapse. If the patient survives, recovery of multi-organ injury may be accompanied by rebound leukocytosis and alopecia starting about 1 week after the initial ingestion.

Treatment of colchicine poisoning should begin with gastric lavage and measures to prevent shock. Otherwise, treatment is symptomatic and supportive. No specific antidote is known. Colchicine is not effectively removed by dialysis [See Pharmacokinetics].

10. DRUG INTERACTIONS

Colchicine is a substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Of the cytochrome P450 enzymes tested, CYP3A4 was mainly involved in the metabolism of colchicine. If colchicine is administered with drugs that inhibit P-gp, most of which also inhibit CYP3A4, increased concentrations of colchicine are likely. Fatal drug interactions have been reported.

Physicians should ensure that patients are suitable candidates for treatment with colchicine and remain alert for signs and symptoms of toxicities related to increased colchicine exposure as a result of a drug interaction. Signs and symptoms of colchicine toxicity should be evaluated promptly and, if toxicity is suspected, colchicine should be discontinued immediately.

Table 4 provides recommendations as a result of other potentially significant drug interactions. Table 1 provides recommendations for strong and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors and P-gp inhibitors.

Table 4: Other Potentially Significant Drug Interactions

11. PHARMACOKINETICS

Absorption

In healthy adults, colchicine is absorbed when given orally, reaching a mean Cmax of 2.5 ng/mL (range 1.1 to 4.4 ng/mL) in 1 to 2 hours (range 0.5 to 3 hours) after a single dose administered under fasting conditions.

Following oral administration of colchicine given as 1.8 mg colchicine over 1 hour to healthy, young adults under fasting conditions, colchicine appears to be readily absorbed, reaching mean maximum plasma concentrations of 6.2 ng/mL at a median 1.81 hours (range: 1.0 to 2.5 hours). Following administration of the non-recommended high-dose regimen (4.8 mg over 6 hours), mean maximal plasma concentrations were 6.8 ng/mL, at a median 4.47 hours (range: 3.1 to 7.5 hours).

After 10 days on a regimen of 0.6 mg twice daily, peak concentrations are 3.1 to 3.6 ng/mL (range 1.6 to 6.0 ng/mL), occurring 1.3 to 1.4 hours post-dose (range 0.5 to 3.0 hours). Mean pharmacokinetic parameter values in healthy adults are shown in Table 5 below.

Table 5: Mean (%CV) Pharmacokinetic Parameters in Healthy Adults Given Colchicine

1 Tmax mean (range)

CL= Dose/AUC0-t (Calculated from mean values)

Vd = CL/Ke (Calculated from mean values)

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In some subjects, secondary colchicine peaks are seen, occurring between 3 and 36 hours post-dose and ranging from 39% to 155% of the height of the initial peak. These observations are attributed to intestinal secretion and reabsorption and/or biliary recirculation.

Absolute bioavailability is reported to be approximately 45%.

Administration of colchicine with food has no effect on the rate of colchicine absorption, but did decrease the extent of colchicine by approximately 15%. This is without clinical significance.

Distribution

The mean apparent volume of distribution in healthy young volunteers was approximately 5 to 8 L/kg.

Colchicine binding to serum protein is low, 39 ± 5%, primarily to albumin regardless of concentration.

Colchicine crosses the placenta (plasma levels in the fetus are reported to be approximately 15% of the maternal concentration). Colchicine also distributes into breast milk at concentrations similar to those found in the maternal serum [See Pregnancy and Nursing Mothers].

Metabolism

Colchicine is demethylated to two primary metabolites, 2-O-demethylcolchicine and 3-O-demethylcolchicine (2- and 3-DMC, respectively), and one minor metabolite, 10-O-demethylcolchicine (also known as colchiceine). In vitro studies using human liver microsomes have shown that CYP3A4 is involved in the metabolism of colchicine to 2- and 3-DMC. Plasma levels of these metabolites are minimal (less than 5% of parent drug).

Elimination/Excretion

In healthy volunteers (n=12) 40 – 65% of 1 mg orally administered colchicine was recovered unchanged in urine. Enterohepatic recirculation and biliary excretion are also postulated to play a role in colchicine elimination. Following multiple oral doses (0.6 mg twice daily), the mean elimination half-lives in young healthy volunteers (mean age 25 to 28 years of age) is 26.6 to 31.2 hours. Colchicine is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp).

Extracorporeal Elimination: Colchicine is not removed by hemodialysis.

Special Populations

There is no difference between men and women in the pharmacokinetic disposition of colchicine.

Pediatric Patients: Pharmacokinetics of colchicine was not evaluated in pediatric patients.

Elderly: Pharmacokinetics of colchicine has not been determined in elderly patients. A published report described the pharmacokinetics of 1 mg oral colchicine tablet in four elderly women compared to six young healthy males. The mean age of the four elderly women was 83 years (range 75 – 93), mean weight was 47 kg (38 – 61 kg) and mean creatinine clearance was 46 mL/min (range 25 – 75 mL/min). Mean peak plasma levels and AUC of colchicine were two times higher in elderly subjects compared to young healthy males. However, it is possible that the higher exposure in the elderly subjects was due to decreased renal function.

Renal impairment: Pharmacokinetics of colchicine in patients with mild and moderate renal impairment is not known. A published report described the disposition of colchicine (1 mg) in young adult men and women with FMF who had normal renal function or end-stage renal disease requiring dialysis. Patients with end-stage renal disease had 75% lower colchicine clearance (0.17 vs 0.73 L/hr/kg) and prolonged plasma elimination half-life (18.8 hrs vs 4.4 hrs) as compared to subjects with FMF and normal renal function [See Dose Modification in Renal Impairment and Renal Impairment].

Hepatic impairment: Published reports on the pharmacokinetics of IV colchicine in patients with severe chronic liver disease, as well as those with alcoholic or primary biliary cirrhosis, and normal renal function suggest wide inter-patient variability. In some subjects with mild to moderate cirrhosis, the clearance of colchicine is significantly reduced and plasma half-life prolonged compared to healthy subjects. In subjects with primary biliary cirrhosis, no consistent trends were noted [See Dose Modification in Hepatic Impairment and Hepatic Impairment]. No pharmacokinetic data are available for patients with severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh C).

12. HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

1) How Available:

a) Brand name: COLCRYS, by AR Holding Co.

b) Generic drugs: NONE.

2) How Supplied:

COLCRYS (colchicine, USP) tablets 0.6 mg, are purple, film-coated, capsule-shaped tablets, debossed with ‘AR 374’ on one side and scored on the other side.

Bottles of 30 NDC 54868-6256-0

Bottles of 90 NDC 54868-6256-1

3) Storage:

Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature]

Protect from light. DISPENSE IN TIGHT, LIGHT-RESISTANT CONTAINER.

Rx only

Rev 04/12