rsi ad
 
drx ad
 
ad space

Roflumilast Tablets

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. DESCRIPTION 7. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS
2. INDICATIONS AND USAGE 8. ADVERSE REACTIONS
3. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION 9. OVERDOSAGE
4. CONTRAINDICATIONS 10. DRUG INTERACTIONS
5. MECHANISM OF ACTION 11. PHARMACOKINETICS
6. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS 12. HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

 

1. DESCRIPTION

Roflumilast and its active metabolite (roflumilast N-oxide) are selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors. The chemical name of roflumilast is N-(3,5-dichloropyridin-4-yl)-3-cyclopropylmethoxy-4-difluoromethoxy-benzamide, and its structural formula is:

Molecular formula: C17H14Cl2F2N2O3 - Molecular weight: 403.22

Roflumilast is a white to off-white non-hygroscopic powder with a melting point of 160°C. It is practically insoluble in water and hexane, sparingly soluble in ethanol and freely soluble in acetone.

Roflumilast is supplied as white to off-white, round tablets, embossed with “D” on one side and “500” on the other side. Each tablet contains 500 mcg of roflumilast.

Each tablet of roflumilast for oral administration contains the following inactive ingredients: lactose monohydrate, corn starch, povidone and magnesium stearate.

2. INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Roflumilast is indicated as a treatment to reduce the risk of COPD exacerbations in patients with severe COPD associated with chronic bronchitis and a history of exacerbations.

Limitations of Use

Roflumilast is not a bronchodilator and is not indicated for the relief of acute bronchospasm.

3. DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

The recommended dose of roflumilast is one 500 microgram (mcg) tablet per day, with or without food.

4. CONTRAINDICATIONS

The use of roflumilast is contraindicated in the following conditions:

• Moderate to severe liver impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) [see Use in Special Populations].

5. MECHANISM OF ACTION

Roflumilast and its active metabolite (roflumilast N-oxide) are selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4). Roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide inhibition of PDE4 (a major cyclic-3#,5#-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP)-metabolizing enzyme in lung tissue) activity leads to accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP. While the specific mechanism(s) by which roflumilast exerts its therapeutic action in COPD patients is not well defined, it is thought to be related to the effects of increased intracellular cyclic AMP in lung cells.

6. USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

6.1 Usage in Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C

There are no adequate and well controlled studies of roflumilast in pregnant women.

Roflumilast was not teratogenic in mice, rats, or rabbits. Roflumilast should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Roflumilast induced stillbirth and decreased pup viability in mice at doses corresponding to approximately 16 and 49 times, respectively, the maximum recommended human dose (MRHD) (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses > 2 mg/kg/day and 6 mg/kg/day, respectively). Roflumilast induced post-implantation loss in rats at doses greater than or equal to approximately 10 times the MRHD (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses ≥ 0.6 mg/kg/day). No treatment-related effects on embryo-fetal development were observed in mice, rats, and rabbits at approximately 12, 3, and 26 times the MRHD, respectively (on a mg/m2 basis at maternal doses of 1.5, 0.2, and 0.8 mg/kg/day, respectively).

6.2 Labor and Delivery

Roflumilast should not be used during labor and delivery. There are no human studies that have investigated effects of roflumilast on preterm labor or labor at term; however, animal studies showed that roflumilast disrupted the labor and delivery process in mice. Roflumilast induced delivery retardation in pregnant mice at doses greater than or equal to approximately 16 times the MRHD (on a mg/m2 basis at a maternal dose of > 2 mg/kg/day).

6.3 Nursing Mothers

Roflumilast and/or its metabolites are excreted into the milk of lactating rats. Excretion of roflumilast and/or its metabolites into human milk is probable. There are no human studies that have investigated effects of roflumilast on breast-fed infants. Roflumilast should not be used by women who are nursing.

6.4 Pediatric Use

COPD does not normally occur in children. The safety and effectiveness of roflumilast in pediatric patients have not been established.

6.5 Geriatric Use

Of the 4438 COPD subjects exposed to roflumilast for up to 12 months in 8 controlled clinical trials, 2022 were > 65 years of age and 471 were > 75 years of age. No overall differences in safety or effectiveness were observed between these subjects and younger subjects and other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients, but greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out. Based on available data for roflumilast, no adjustment of dosage in geriatric patients is warranted.

6.6 Hepatic Impairment

Roflumilast 250 mcg once daily for 14 days was studied in subjects with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment classified as Child-Pugh A and B (8 subjects in each group). The AUCs of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were increased by 51% and 24%, respectively in Child-Pugh A subjects and by 92% and 41%, respectively in Child-Pugh B subjects, as compared to age-, weight- and gender-matched healthy subjects. The Cmax of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were increased by 3% and 26%, respectively in Child-Pugh A subjects and by 26% and 40%, respectively in Child-Pugh B subjects, as compared to healthy subjects. Roflumilast 500 mcg has not been studied in hepatically impaired patients. Clinicians should consider the risk-benefit of administering roflumilast to patients who have mild liver impairment (Child-Pugh A). Roflumilast is not recommended for use in patients with moderate or severe liver impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) [see Contraindications].

6.7 Renal Impairment

In twelve subjects with severe renal impairment administered a single dose of 500 mcg roflumilast, the AUCs of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were decreased by 21% and 7%, respectively and Cmax were reduced by 16% and 12%, respectively. No dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with renal impairment.

7. WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

7.1 Treatment of Acute Bronchospasm

Roflumilast is not a bronchodilator and should not be used for the relief of acute bronchospasm.

7.2 Psychiatric Events including Suicidality

Treatment with roflumilast is associated with an increase in psychiatric adverse reactions. In 8 controlled clinical trials 5.9% (263) of patients treated with roflumilast 500 mcg daily reported psychiatric adverse reactions compared to 3.3% (137) treated with placebo. The most commonly reported psychiatric adverse reactions were insomnia, anxiety, and depression which were reported at higher rates in those treated with roflumilast 500 mcg daily (2.4%, 1.4%, and 1.2% for roflumilast versus 1.0%, 0.9%, and 0.9% for placebo, respectively) [see Adverse Reactions]. Instances of suicidal ideation and behavior, including completed suicide, have been observed in clinical trials. Three patients experienced suicide-related adverse reactions (one completed suicide and two suicide attempts) while receiving roflumilast compared to one patient (suicidal ideation) who received placebo.

Before using roflumilast in patients with a history of depression and/or suicidal thoughts or behavior, prescribers should carefully weigh the risks and benefits of treatment with roflumilast in such patients. Patients, their caregivers, and families should be advised of the need to be alert for the emergence or worsening of insomnia, anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts or other mood changes, and if such changes occur to contact their healthcare provider. Prescribers should carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of continuing treatment with roflumilast if such events occur.

7.3 Weight Decrease

Weight loss was a common adverse reaction in roflumilast clinical trials and was reported in 7.5% (331) of patients treated with roflumilast 500 mcg once daily compared to 2.1% (89) treated with placebo [see Adverse Reactions]. In addition to being reported as adverse reactions, weight was prospectively assessed in two placebo-controlled clinical trials of one year duration. In these studies, 20% of patients receiving roflumilast experienced moderate weight loss (defined as between 5-10% of body weight) compared to 7% of patients who received placebo. In addition, 7% of patients who received roflumilast compared to 2% of patients receiving placebo experienced severe (>10% body weight) weight loss. During follow-up after treatment discontinuation, the majority of patients with weight loss regained some of the weight they had lost while receiving roflumilast. Patients treated with roflumilast should have their weight monitored regularly. If unexplained or clinically significant weight loss occurs, weight loss should be evaluated, and discontinuation of roflumilast should be considered.

8. ADVERSE REACTIONS

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The safety data described below reflect exposure of 4438 patients to roflumilast 500 mcg once daily in four 1-year placebo-controlled trials, two 6-month placebo-controlled trials, and two 6-month drug add-on trials. In these trials, 3136 and 1232 COPD patients were exposed to roflumilast 500 mcg once daily for 6 months and 1-year, respectively.

The population had a median age of 64 years (range 40-91), 73% were male, 92.9% were Caucasian, and had COPD with a mean prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) of 8.9 to 89.1% predicted. In these trials, 68.5% of the patients treated with roflumilast reported an adverse reaction compared with 65.3% treated with placebo.

The proportion of patients who discontinued treatment due to adverse reaction was 14.8% for roflumilast-treated patients and 9.9% for placebo-treated patients. The most common adverse reactions that led to discontinuation of roflumilast were diarrhea (2.4%) and nausea (1.6%).

Serious adverse reactions, whether considered drug-related or not by the investigators, which occurred more frequently in roflumilast-treated patients include diarrhea, atrial fibrillation, lung cancer, prostate cancer, acute pancreatitis, and acute renal failure. Table 1 summarizes the adverse reactions reported by ³ 2% of patients in the roflumilast group 8 controlled COPD clinical trials.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions Reported by ≥ 2% of Patients Treated with Roflumilast 500 mcg daily and Greater Than Placebo

Adverse reactions that occurred in the roflumilast group at a frequency of 1 to 2% where rates exceeded that in the placebo group include:

Gastrointestinal disorders - abdominal pain, dyspepsia, gastritis, vomiting

Infections and infestations - rhinitis, sinusitis, urinary tract infection

Musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders - muscle spasms

Nervous system disorders - tremor

Psychiatric disorders - anxiety, depression

9. OVERDOSAGE

9.1 Human Experience

No case of overdose has been reported in clinical studies with roflumilast. During the Phase I studies of roflumilast, the following symptoms were observed at an increased rate after a single oral dose of 2500 mcg and a single dose of 5000 mcg: headache, gastrointestinal disorders, dizziness, palpitations, lightheadedness, clamminess and arterial hypotension.

9.2 Management of Overdose

In case of overdose, patients should seek immediate medical help. Appropriate supportive medical care should be provided. Since roflumilast is highly protein bound, hemodialysis is not likely to be an efficient method of drug removal. It is not known whether roflumilast is dialyzable by peritoneal dialysis.

10. DRUG INTERACTIONS

A major step in roflumilast metabolism is the N-oxidation of roflumilast to roflumilast N-oxide by CYP3A4 and CYP1A2. The administration of the cytochrome P450 enzyme inducer rifampicin resulted in a reduction in exposure, which may result in a decrease in the therapeutic effectiveness of roflumilast. Therefore, the use of strong cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers (e.g. rifampicin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin) with roflumilast is not recommended.

10.1 Drugs That Induce Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Enzymes

Strong cytochrome P450 enzyme inducers decrease systemic exposure to roflumilast and may reduce the therapeutic effectiveness of roflumilast. Therefore the use of strong cytochrome P450 inducers (e.g., rifampicin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and phenytoin) with roflumilast is not recommended [see Drug Interactions].

10.2 Drugs That Inhibit Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Enzymes

The co-administration of roflumilast (500 mcg) with CYP3A4 inhibitors or dual inhibitors that inhibit both CYP3A4 and CYP1A2 simultaneously (e.g., erythromycin, ketoconazole, fluvoxamine, enoxacin, cimetidine) may increase roflumilast systemic exposure and may result in increased adverse reactions. The risk of such concurrent use should be weighed carefully against benefit.

10.3 Oral Contraceptives Containing Gestodene and Ethinyl Estradiol

The co-administration of roflumilast (500 mcg) with oral contraceptives containing gestodene and ethinyl estradiol may increase roflumilast systemic exposure and may result in increased side effects. The risk of such concurrent use should be weighed carefully against benefit.

11. PHARMACOKINETICS

Absorption

The absolute bioavailability of roflumilast following a 500 mcg oral dose is approximately 80%. Maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of roflumilast typically occur approximately one hour after dosing (ranging from 0.5 to 2 hours) in the fasted state while plateau-like maximum concentrations of the N-oxide metabolite are reached in approximately eight hours (ranging from 4 to 13 hours). Food has no affect on total drug absorption, but delays time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of roflumilast by one hour and reduces Cmax by approximately 40%, however, Cmax and Tmax of roflumilast N-oxide are unaffected. An in vitro study showed that roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide did not inhibit P-gp transporter.

Distribution

Plasma protein binding of roflumilast and its N-oxide metabolite is approximately 99% and 97%, respectively. Volume of distribution for single dose 500 mcg roflumilast is about 2.9 L/kg. Studies in rats with radiolabeled roflumilast indicate low penetration across the blood-brain barrier.

Metabolism

Roflumilast is extensively metabolized via Phase I (cytochrome P450) and Phase II (conjugation) reactions. The N-oxide metabolite is the only major metabolite observed in the plasma of humans. Together, roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide account for the majority (87.5%) of total dose administered in plasma. In urine, roflumilast was not detectable while roflumilast N-oxide was only a trace metabolite (less than 1%). Other conjugated metabolites such as roflumilast N-oxide glucuronide and 4-amino-3,5-dichloropyridine N-oxide were detected in urine.

While roflumilast is three times more potent than roflumilast N-oxide at inhibition of the PDE4 enzyme in vitro, the plasma AUC of roflumilast N-oxide on average is about 10-fold greater than the plasma AUC of roflumilast.

In vitro studies and clinical drug-drug interaction studies suggest that the biotransformation of roflumilast to its N-oxide metabolite is mediated by CYP 1A2 and 3A4. Based on further in vitro results in human liver microsomes, therapeutic plasma concentrations of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide do not inhibit CYP 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 3A4/5, or 4A9/11. Therefore, there is a low probability of relevant interactions with substances metabolized by these P450 enzymes. In addition, in vitro studies demonstrated no induction of the CYP 1A2, 2A6, 2C9, 2C19, or 3A4/5 and only a weak induction of CYP 2B6 by roflumilast.

Elimination

The plasma clearance after short-term intravenous infusion of roflumilast is on average about 9.6 L/h. Following an oral dose, the median plasma effective half-life of roflumilast and its N-oxide metabolite are approximately 17 and 30 hours, respectively. Steady state plasma concentrations of roflumilast and its N-oxide metabolite are reached after approximately 4 days for roflumilast and 6 days for roflumilast N-oxide following once daily dosing. Following intravenous or oral administration of radiolabeled roflumilast, about 70% of the radioactivity was recovered in the urine.

Special Populations

Hepatic Impairment

Roflumilast 250 mcg once daily for 14 days was studied in subjects with mild-to-moderate hepatic impairment classified as Child-Pugh A and B (8 subjects in each group). The AUC of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were increased by 51% and 24%, respectively in Child-Pugh A subjects and by 92% and 41%, respectively in Child-Pugh B subjects, as compared to age-, weight- and gender-matched healthy subjects. The Cmax of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were increased by 3% and 26%, respectively in Child-Pugh A subjects and by 26% and 40%, respectively in Child-Pugh B subjects, as compared to healthy subjects. Roflumilast 500 mcg has not been studied in hepatically impaired patients. Clinicians should consider the risk-benefit of administering roflumilast to patients who have mild liver impairment (Child-Pugh A). Roflumilast is not recommended for use in patients with moderate or severe liver impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) [see Contraindications and Use in Specific Populations].

Renal Impairment

In twelve subjects with severe renal impairment administered a single dose of 500 mcg roflumilast, roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide AUCs were decreased by 21% and 7%, respectively and Cmax were reduced by 16% and 12%, respectively. No dosage adjustment is necessary for patients with renal impairment [see Use in Specific Populations].

Age

Roflumilast 500 mcg once daily for 15 days was studied in young, middle aged, and elderly healthy subjects. The exposure in elderly (> 65 years of age) were 27% higher in AUC and 16% higher in Cmax for roflumilast and 19% higher in AUC and 13% higher in Cmax for roflumilast-N-oxide than that in young volunteers (18-45 years old). No dosage adjustment is necessary for elderly patients [see Use in Specific Populations].

Gender

In a Phase I study evaluating the effect of age and gender on the pharmacokinetics of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide, a 39% and 33% increase in roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide AUC were noted in healthy female subjects as compared to healthy male subjects. No dosage adjustment is necessary based on gender.

Smoking

The pharmacokinetics of roflumilast and roflumilast N-oxide were comparable in smokers as compared to non-smokers. There was no difference in Cmax between smokers and non-smokers when roflumilast 500 mcg was administered as a single dose to 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers. The AUC of roflumilast in smokers was 13% less than that in non-smokers while the AUC of roflumilast N-oxide in smokers was 17% more than that in non-smokers.

Race

As compared to Caucasians, African Americans, Hispanics, and Japanese showed 16%, 41%, and 15% higher AUC, respectively, for roflumilast and 43%, 27%, and 16% higher AUC, respectively, for roflumilast N-oxide. As compared to Caucasians, African Americans, Hispanics, and Japanese showed 8%, 21%, and 5% higher Cmax, respectively, for roflumilast and 43%, 27%, and 17% higher Cmax, respectively, for roflumilast N-oxide. No dosage adjustment is necessary for race.

12. HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING

1) How Available:

a) Brand name: DALIRESP, by FOREST RES INST INC.

b) Generic drugs: None.

2) How Supplied:

DALIRESP is supplied as white to off-white, round tablets, embossed with “D” on one side and “500” on the other side. Each tablet contains 500 mcg of roflumilast.

DALIRESP tablets are available in bottles containing:

30 tablets - NDC 0456-0095-30

90 tablets - NDC 0456-0095-90.

3) Storage:

Store at 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); excursions permitted to 15° - 30°C (59° - 86°F). [see USP Controlled Room Temperature].

Rx only

Rev 02/11